Sheepdog Church Security Services

Sheepdog Church Security serves the Church near Sarasota by providing training materials to part-time Church Safety Officers and Security Directors. We give them the tools they need to provide reputable and realistic training to their Church Safety Team members without spending hours researching and developing courses from scratch.

Sarasota Church Security

Sheepdog Church Security serves small-to-medium size churches across the Sarasota area. Our training bundles are downloadable and customizable to fit your needs. Every facet of our training is vetted by experience security professionals, like our founder, Kris. P. Moloney.

Kris is a police officer with more than 15 years of experience, and is also a retired Army Captain and Company Commander. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Ministry and a Master’s Degree in Organizational Leadership. He also has certifications in a number of specialties, such as:

Protect your Sarasota church with our useful safety ministry training.

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Sarasota () is a city in Sarasota County on the southwestern coast of the U.S. state of Florida. The area is renowned for its cultural and environmental amenities, beaches, resorts, and the Sarasota School of Architecture. The city is at the southern end of the Tampa Bay Area, north of Fort Myers and Punta Gorda. Its official limits include Sarasota Bay and several barrier islands between the bay and the Gulf of Mexico. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2013 Sarasota had a population of 53,326. In 1986 it became designated as a certified local government. Sarasota is a principal city of the Sarasota metropolitan area, and is the seat of Sarasota County.

The islands separating Sarasota Bay from the gulf near the city, known as keys, include Lido Key and Siesta Key, which are famous worldwide for the quality of their sandy beaches. The keys that are included in the boundary of Sarasota are Lido Key, St. Armands Key, Otter Key, Coon Key, Bird Key, and portions of Siesta Key. Previously, Siesta Key was named Sarasota Key. At one time, it and all of Longboat Key were considered part of Sarasota and confusing contemporaneous references may be found discussing them.

Longboat Key is the largest key separating the bay from the gulf, but it is now evenly divided by the new county line of 1921. The portion of the key that parallels the Sarasota city boundary that extends to that new county line along the bay front of the mainland was removed from the city boundaries at the request of John Ringling in the mid-1920s, who sought to avoid city taxation of his planned developments at the southern tip of the key. Although they never were completed in the quickly faltering economy, those development concessions granted by the city never were reversed and the county has retained regulation of those lands.

The city limits had expanded significantly with the real estate rush of the early twentieth century, reaching almost 70 square miles. The wild speculation boom began to crash in 1926 and following that, the city limits began to contract, shrinking to less than a quarter of that area.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 25.9 square miles, of which 14.9 sq mi is land and 11.0 sq mi is water.

As of the census of 2000, there were 52,715 people, 23,427 households, and 12,064 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,539.8 per square mile . The racial makeup of the city was 76.91% White, 16.02% African American, 0.35% Native American, 1.02% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 3.74% from other races, and 1.91% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.92% of the population.

Source: Wikipedia