Sheepdog Church Security Services

Sheepdog Church Security serves the Church near Camden by providing training materials to part-time Church Safety Officers and Security Directors. We give them the tools they need to provide reputable and realistic training to their Church Safety Team members without spending hours researching and developing courses from scratch.

Camden Church Security

Sheepdog Church Security serves small-to-medium size churches across the Camden area. Our training bundles are downloadable and customizable to fit your needs. Every facet of our training is vetted by experience security professionals, like our founder, Kris. P. Moloney.

Kris is a police officer with more than 15 years of experience, and is also a retired Army Captain and Company Commander. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Ministry and a Master’s Degree in Organizational Leadership. He also has certifications in a number of specialties, such as:

Protect your Camden church with our useful safety ministry training.

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Camden is a city in Camden County, New Jersey. Camden is located directly across the Delaware River from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. At the 2010 United States Census, the city had a population of 77,344. Camden is the 12th most populous municipality in New Jersey. The city was incorporated on February 13, 1828. Camden has been the county seat of Camden County since the county was formed on March 13, 1844. The city derives its name from Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden. Camden is made up of over twenty different neighborhoods.

By the end of the nineteenth century Camden began to industrialize with the foundation of the Campbell Soup Company by Joseph Campbell. Other companies such as the New York Shipbuilding Corporation and the Victor Talking Machine Company began their operations and helped Camden move into an industrial economy. At the beginning of the twentieth century Camden's population consisted mostly of European immigrants. German, British, and Irish immigrants, as well as African Americans from the south made up the majority of the city in the mid nineteenth century. Around the turn of the twentieth century Italian and Eastern European immigrants had become the majority of the population.

The city was consistently prosperous throughout the Great Depression and World War II. After World War II, Camden manufacturers began gradually closing their factories and moving out of the city. Camden's cultural history has been greatly affected by both its economic and social position over the years. With the loss of manufacturing jobs came a sharp decline in population numbers. Suburbanization also had an effect on the drop in population. Civil unrest and crime became common in Camden with the decline in population. In 1971, civil unrest reached its peak with riots breaking out in response to the death of Horacio Jimenez, a Puerto Rican motorist who was killed by two white police officers.

Camden's industrial and post-industrial history gave rise to distinct neighborhoods and cultural groups that have affected the status of the city over the course of the 20th century. Over the years Camden has made many attempts to restore its economic stature. In the 1980s Mayor Randy Primas campaigned for the city to adopt two different nuisance industries: a prison and a trash-to-steam incinerator. Despite opposition from Camden residents, the Riverfront State Prison was opened in 1985 and the trash-to-steam plant opened in 1989. With the addition of the trash-to-steam plant Camden has faced numerous air and water pollution issues. Camden is also the home of a waste-water treatment facility. In the 1970s, dangerous pollutants were found in the wells from which many Camden citizens received their household water. These pollutants decreased property values in Camden and caused health problems among the city's residents. Pollution is an ongoing issue that local nonprofits are trying to solve.

Camden is home to hospitals, schools, and attractions. The Camden waterfront holds four tourist attractions, the USS New Jersey; the BB&T Pavilion; Campbell's Field; and the Adventure Aquarium. Campbell's Field had been home to the minor league baseball team, the Camden Riversharks. The city is the home of Rutgers University–Camden, which was founded as the South Jersey Law School in 1926, and Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, which opened in 2012. Camden also houses both Cooper University Hospital and Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center. The "eds and meds" institutions account for roughly 45% of Camden's total employment. Camden had the highest crime rate in the United States in 2012, with 2,566 violent crimes for every 100,000 people, 6.6 times higher than the national average of 387 violent crimes per 100,000 citizens.

Camden has historically been a stronghold of the Democratic Party. Voter turnout is very low; approximately 50% of Camden's registered voters participated in the 2016 General Election. Three of Camden's mayors have been jailed for corruption, the most recent being Milton Milan in 2000. From 2005 to 2012, the school system and police department were operated by the state of New Jersey. 40% of residents are below the national poverty line. In 2015 Mayor Dana L. Redd announced a $830 million plan to continue development on the waterfront.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 10.341 square miles, including 8.921 square miles of land and 1.420 square miles of water .

As of 2006, 52% of the city's residents lived in poverty, one of the highest rates in the nation. The city had a median household income of $18,007, the lowest of all U.S. communities with populations of more than 65,000 residents, making it America's poorest city. A group of poor Camden residents were the subject of a 20/20 special on poverty in America broadcast on January 26, 2007, in which Diane Sawyer profiled the lives of three young children growing up in Camden. A follow-up was shown on November 9, 2007.

Source: Wikipedia