Sheepdog Church Security Services

Sheepdog Church Security serves the Church near Flint by providing training materials to part-time Church Safety Officers and Security Directors. We give them the tools they need to provide reputable and realistic training to their Church Safety Team members without spending hours researching and developing courses from scratch.

Flint Church Security

Sheepdog Church Security serves small-to-medium size churches across the Flint area. Our training bundles are downloadable and customizable to fit your needs. Every facet of our training is vetted by experience security professionals, like our founder, Kris. P. Moloney.

Kris is a police officer with more than 15 years of experience, and is also a retired Army Captain and Company Commander. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Ministry and a Master’s Degree in Organizational Leadership. He also has certifications in a number of specialties, such as:

Protect your Flint church with our useful safety ministry training.

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Flint is the largest city and county seat of Genesee County, Michigan. Located along the Flint River, 66 miles northwest of Detroit, it is a principal city within the region known as Mid Michigan. According to the 2010 census, Flint has a population of 102,434, making it the seventh largest city in Michigan. The Flint metropolitan area is located entirely within Genesee County. It is the fourth largest metropolitan area in Michigan with a population of 425,790 in 2010. The city was incorporated in 1855.

Flint was founded as a village by fur trader Jacob Smith in 1819 and became a major lumbering area on the historic Saginaw Trail during the 19th century. From the late 19th century to the mid 20th century, the city was a leading manufacturer of carriages and later automobiles, earning it the nickname "Vehicle City". General Motors was founded in Flint in 1908, and the city grew into an automobile manufacturing powerhouse for GM's Buick and Chevrolet divisions after World War II up until the mid 1970s. Flint was also the home of the Flint Sit-Down Strike of 1936–37 that played a vital role in the formation of the United Auto Workers.

Since the late 1960s, Flint has faced several crises. The city sank into a deep economic depression after GM significantly downsized its workforce in the area from a 1978 high of 80,000 to under 8,000 by 2010. From 1960 to 2010, the population of the city nearly halved from 196,940 to 102,434. In the mid-2000s, Flint became known for its high crime rates and has repeatedly been ranked among the most dangerous cities in the United States. The city was under a state of financial emergency from 2002–2004 and again from 2011–2015. Since 2014, the city has faced a major public health emergency due to lead poisoning in the local water supply that has affected thousands of residents, as well as an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease due to tainted water.

Flint lies in the Flint/Tri-Cities region of Michigan. Flint and Genesee County can be categorized as a subregion of Flint/Tri-Cities. It is located along the Flint River, which flows through Lapeer, Genesee, and Saginaw counties and is 78.3 miles long.

As of the 2000 census, there were 124,943 people, 48,744 households, and 30,270 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,714.9 per square mile . The racial makeup of the city was 53.3% Black or African American, 41.4% White, 0.6% Native American, 0.4% Asian, <0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.1% from other races, and 3.1% from two or more races. 3.0% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 7.2% were of German and 5.6% American ancestry. 96.0% spoke English and 2.5% Spanish as their first language.

Source: Wikipedia