Church Security Guide

One of the most common questions I am asked is about using force to protect others in the church. The topic is evokes a lot of emotion in both its advocates and critics. While I’m not going to make an argument for using force in church, here, what I am going to do is provide some basic guidelines and training resources.

Fists in defensive positions

Table of Contents

Use of Force Training

Recommended Annual Use of Force Training

  1. Firearm Qualification – I recommend shooting your State’s P.O.S.T or Licensed Security Guard standard. While this is a higher standard than necessary, it demonstrates your team can shoot a State recognized standard.
  2. Tactical Shoot – Each team member needs to learn to shoot under simulated combat conditions. This means shooting from covered positions, kneeling and prone positions. It also includes drawing and shooting on the move and at various targets.
  3. Force on Force – Using Airsoft guns have your team respond to an active shooter in different areas of the church. Change up scenarios and tested members so everyone has the opportunity to be the primary responder and neutralizer.
  4. Shoot and Don’t Shoot – On the same day of Force on Force training add in several scenarios where deadly force is not needed or authorized. This will keep your team on their toes and remind them that deadly force is not always the right response.
  5. Unarmed Control Techniques – It is far more likely your team will have to physically restrain a violent person then using deadly force. Train your team in escort holds, wrist locks, arm bars and take-downs. Call in a local Self Defense instructor, if necessary.
  6. Classroom Instruction – Each of the above topics (chapters) should be taught every year without fail to ensure your team completely understands Active Shooter Neutralization and Lock Down Drills, Dealing with Disruptive Persons using Verbal Deescalation and Protecting Yourself and the Church with Use of Force Laws.

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